Friday, May 12, 2006

The Chinese National Tea Museum Visit in Hangzhou

The Chinese National Tea Museum is situated at the Double Peaks, one of the ten famous sceneries in West Lake, Hangzhou. With Jiqing Mountain to it's north and Wulao Mountain to its south and beautiful gardens throughout this serene setting hosts many important tea competitions, exhibitions and trainings. An important historic facility the museum includes exhibits on topics including;
Tea Culture
Tea Utensils
Tea Varieties and Processing
Tea Water
The winner of numerous prestigious awards the museum does a great job in continuing to educate both foreigners and the Chinese about tea culture throughout the ages. We really enjoyed our visit here.




As you approach the museum from the gardens this lovely statue of Lu Yu, the founder and father of tea, stands to greet guests.



Tea seeds in one of the museums exhibits, they are the size of hazelnuts.



The tea gardens on the grounds of the museum.



The three university students we met at the museum, Catherine, Alice and Wendy.



The scenery around the museum is lovely.



This giant Pu'erh tuo cha hangs on the wall at the landing between the first and second floors of the Museum.




The Museum has an extensive Pu'erh exhibit with tuo cha's, compressed Pu'erh tea, in many shapes and sizes.



Planted just below Lu Yu is an oolong tea plant at the Tea Museum.



Arriving at the National Tea Museum in West Lake Hangzhou.

2 comments:

Iain L. Stuart said...

Thank you for the great pictures of the tea museum! What a treat to see the beautiful pu'erh tu cha. I have only seen much smaller ones. I have only recently discovered your blog. It is so good. I have loved tea since I was a kid (am now WAY beyond that! 48), and it is exciting to see people begin to love and enjoy good quality tea in this country. Thanks again for the pictures and your account of your trip.

Anonymous said...

I love that museum. I try to get up that way every year. The large compressed cakes are actually called "bings" not "tuos". a Tuo is shaped like a bowl, not flat cakes.

ShanGuan